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Issues

From the Editor

Physics Today 71 (4), 8 (2018); https://doi.org/10.1063/PT.3.3881

Readers’ Forum

Physics Today 71 (4), 10–11 (2018); https://doi.org/10.1063/PT.3.3882
Physics Today 71 (4), 12 (2018); https://doi.org/10.1063/PT.3.3883
Physics Today 71 (4), 12 (2018); https://doi.org/10.1063/PT.3.3884
Physics Today 71 (4), 12–13 (2018); https://doi.org/10.1063/PT.3.3885
Physics Today 71 (4), 13 (2018); https://doi.org/10.1063/PT.3.3886
Physics Today 71 (4), 13 (2018); https://doi.org/10.1063/PT.3.3887
Physics Today 71 (4), 13 (2018); https://doi.org/10.1063/PT.3.3888

Search and Discovery

Physics Today 71 (4), 14–16 (2018); https://doi.org/10.1063/PT.3.3889

As Earth’s frozen soils thaw, they’ll have a significant effect on the global mercury cycle.

Physics Today 71 (4), 17–20 (2018); https://doi.org/10.1063/PT.3.3890

Two research groups demonstrate the coherent interaction between the spin of a single electron and a single microwave photon.

Physics Today 71 (4), 20–22 (2018); https://doi.org/10.1063/PT.3.3891

A turbulent, laser-generated plasma can amplify magnetic fields to cosmic scales.

Physics Today 71 (4), 23 (2018); https://doi.org/10.1063/PT.3.3892
Physics Today 71 (4), 23 (2018); https://doi.org/10.1063/PT.3.3893

Issues and Events

Physics Today 71 (4), 24–28 (2018); https://doi.org/10.1063/PT.3.3894

Record numbers of scientists are fleeing persecution and conflict. Host universities and communities can benefit from the brain gain.

Physics Today 71 (4), 29–31 (2018); https://doi.org/10.1063/PT.3.3895

Basic research in astrophysics and other fields also would be set back by the reprioritizing of the Department of Energy’s weapons program.

Articles

Physics Today 71 (4), 32–39 (2018); https://doi.org/10.1063/PT.3.3896

With the end of the Cold War, most physicists turned their attention away from the nuclear threat. It is now time for us to reengage in the debate over how to reduce the dangers from nuclear weapons.

Physics Today 71 (4), 40–46 (2018); https://doi.org/10.1063/PT.3.3897

By carefully orchestrating atomic-scale interactions, one can coax hard surfaces to slide against one another with virtually no resistance.

Physics Today 71 (4), 48–54 (2018); https://doi.org/10.1063/PT.3.3898

A mix of proteins, polymers, lipids, and tightly bound but fluid shells of water molecules may account for a healthy joint’s ultralow friction.

Books

Physics Today 71 (4), 55–56 (2018); https://doi.org/10.1063/PT.3.3899
Physics Today 71 (4), 56–57 (2018); https://doi.org/10.1063/PT.3.3900
Physics Today 71 (4), 58 (2018); https://doi.org/10.1063/PT.3.3901
Physics Today 71 (4), 59 (2018); https://doi.org/10.1063/PT.3.3902

New Products

Physics Today 71 (4), 60–62 (2018); https://doi.org/10.1063/PT.3.3903

Obituaries

In Special Collection: Print Obituaries
Physics Today 71 (4), 64–65 (2018); https://doi.org/10.1063/PT.3.3904
In Special Collection: Print Obituaries
Physics Today 71 (4), 65 (2018); https://doi.org/10.1063/PT.3.3905

Quick Study

Physics Today 71 (4), 70–71 (2018); https://doi.org/10.1063/PT.3.3906

The Event Horizon Telescope will combine data from a worldwide network of radio telescopes to image the shadow that a black hole casts on the surrounding plasma.

Back Scatter

Physics Today 71 (4), 72 (2018); https://doi.org/10.1063/PT.3.3907
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