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Issues

Reference Frame

Physics Today 62 (9), 8–9 (2009); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.3226778

Letters

Physics Today 62 (9), 10 (2009); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.3226701
Physics Today 62 (9), 10–11 (2009); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4797184
Physics Today 62 (9), 11 (2009); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4797187
Physics Today 62 (9), 11–12 (2009); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4797190
Physics Today 62 (9), 12 (2009); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4797193
Physics Today 62 (9), 12 (2009); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4797195
Physics Today 62 (9), 12 (2009); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4797198
Physics Today 62 (9), 12 (2009); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4797201
Physics Today 62 (9), 12 (2009); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4797204
Physics Today 62 (9), 12 (2009); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4797207
Physics Today 62 (9), 12 (2009); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4797210
Physics Today 62 (9), 12–14 (2009); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4797212
Physics Today 62 (9), 14–15 (2009); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4797215

Search and Discovery

Physics Today 62 (9), 16–17 (2009); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.3226702

A chiral molecule’s transition from a superposition of its left-handed and right-handed isomers to the isomers themselves reveals the nature of the quantum-to-classical transition.

Physics Today 62 (9), 18 (2009); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.3226703
Physics Today 62 (9), 19–21 (2009); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.3226704

A dramatic 57% loss in the volume of perennial ice between 2004 and 2008 may have set the stage for ice-free summers within the next 30 years.

Physics Today 62 (9), 21 (2009); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.3226705
Physics Today 62 (9), 21–22 (2009); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4797218
Physics Today 62 (9), 22 (2009); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4797219
Physics Today 62 (9), 22 (2009); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4797221
Physics Today 62 (9), 22 (2009); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4797223
Physics Today 62 (9), 22 (2009); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4797224

Issues and Events

Physics Today 62 (9), 24–25 (2009); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.3226706

Experts warn lawmakers that an intense solar storm or an attack by a single nuclear weapon could knock out power in an entire region for months.

Physics Today 62 (9), 26–30 (2009); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.3226707
Physics Today 62 (9), 29 (2009); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.3226708
Physics Today 62 (9), 30 (2009); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.3226709
Physics Today 62 (9), 30 (2009); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.3226716
Physics Today 62 (9), 30 (2009); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.3226734

Articles

Physics Today 62 (9), 31–36 (2009); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.3226750

Radioactive decay, the diffusion of daughter nuclides, and the annealing of fission tracks are being used to develop time-versus-temperature histories of rocks and the processes that sculpt Earth’s surface.

Physics Today 62 (9), 38–43 (2009); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.3226854

The notion, introduced 50 years ago, that electrons could be affected by electromagnetic potentials without coming in contact with actual force fields was received with a skepticism that has spawned a flourishing of experimental tests and expansions of the original idea.

Physics Today 62 (9), 44–49 (2009); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.3226855

Ever-improving techniques for manipulating and probing nuclear spins make it possible to obtain detailed structural information about large molecules and disordered compounds.

Books

Physics Today 62 (9), 51 (2009); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.3226768
Physics Today 62 (9), 52 (2009); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.3226769
Physics Today 62 (9), 52–53 (2009); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.3226770
Physics Today 62 (9), 53–54 (2009); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.3226771
Physics Today 62 (9), 54–57 (2009); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.3226772

New Products

Physics Today 62 (9), 58–60 (2009); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.3226773

Obituaries

In Special Collection: Print Obituaries
Physics Today 62 (9), 62–63 (2009); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.3226774
In Special Collection: Print Obituaries
Physics Today 62 (9), 63–64 (2009); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.3226775

Quick Study

Physics Today 62 (9), 66–67 (2009); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.3226776

Why is it that stacked apples seem so stable, but removing the “wrong” apple can cause the whole pile to tumble down?

Back Scatter

Physics Today 62 (9), 84 (2009); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.3226777
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