Skip to Main Content
Skip Nav Destination

Issues

Reference Frame

Physics Today 61 (1), 8–9 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2835168

Letters

Physics Today 61 (1), 10 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2835135
Physics Today 61 (1), 10–11 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4796599
Physics Today 61 (1), 11–12 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4796603
Physics Today 61 (1), 12 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4796606
Physics Today 61 (1), 12–13 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4796608
Physics Today 61 (1), 13 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4796611
Physics Today 61 (1), 13 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4796614
Physics Today 61 (1), 13 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4796616
Physics Today 61 (1), 13–14 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4796619
Physics Today 61 (1), 14–15 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2835136
Physics Today 61 (1), 15 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2835137
Physics Today 61 (1), 15–, 72 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4796622
Physics Today 61 (1), 72 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4796635
Physics Today 61 (1), 72–74 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4796639
Physics Today 61 (1), 74–75 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4796641
Physics Today 61 (1), 75 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2835164
Physics Today 61 (1), 75 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2835165
Physics Today 61 (1), 75 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4796644

Search and Discovery

Physics Today 61 (1), 16–19 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2835138

Though it’s more reassuring than surprising, this new result from the enormous Auger ground array suggests the discovery potential of cosmic-ray astronomy.

Physics Today 61 (1), 19–23 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2835139

The effect, which occurs without a magnetic field, is a new and topologically distinct electronic state.

Physics Today 61 (1), 23–25 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2835140

Diamond submerged in water can lose some of its electrons and acquire p-type charge carriers, but only at low pH.

Physics Today 61 (1), 25–27 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2835141

A decay mode predicted almost 50 years ago has been directly observed for the first time.

Physics Today 61 (1), 26 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2835142
Physics Today 61 (1), 28 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2835143
Physics Today 61 (1), 28 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4796624
Physics Today 61 (1), 28 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4796627
Physics Today 61 (1), 28 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4796630

Issues and Events

Physics Today 61 (1), 30–32 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2835144

Electric power companies are demonstrating the capacity of new flexible wire to deliver more current in less space and to limit power surges.

Physics Today 61 (1), 32–33 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2835145

Academic institutions fear that an Appropriations rider could undermine the long-established system for recovering research costs and financing new laboratories.

Physics Today 61 (1), 33–36 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2835146

How do you run NASA effectively? Physics Today asks agency head Michael Griffin.

Physics Today 61 (1), 36–38 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2835147

The latest compact systems promise big benefits in a diverse array of practical applications, particularly in the biological and medical arenas.

Physics Today 61 (1), 38–40 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2835148

No successor is apparent for “St. Pete,” who showered funding and new programs on the labs.

Physics Today 61 (1), 40–41 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2835149

South Dakota has taken the initiative to begin installing a variety of experiments in the 8000-foot-deep mine this year–long before the federal government can make its final decision.

Physics Today 61 (1), 41 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2835150
Physics Today 61 (1), 41 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2835151
Physics Today 61 (1), 41 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4796632

Articles

Physics Today 61 (1), 42–47 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2835152

Experiments can measure, and theory explain, the energetics behind packaging a virus with DNA and the DNA’s injection into a cell.

Physics Today 61 (1), 48–54 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2835153

The imaging of unstained and fully hydrated biological specimens embedded in vitreous ice is leading to powerful advances in understanding the structural basis of biological phenomena.

Physics Today 61 (1), 55–57 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2835154

The computations for the first-ever numerical experiment were performed by a young woman named Mary Tsingou. After decades of omission, it is time to recognize her contribution.

Books

Physics Today 61 (1), 59 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2835155
Physics Today 61 (1), 59–60 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2835156
Physics Today 61 (1), 60–62 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2835157
Physics Today 61 (1), 62 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2835158
Physics Today 61 (1), 62–63 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2835159
Physics Today 61 (1), 63–64 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2835160
Physics Today 61 (1), 64–66 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2835161

New Products

Physics Today 61 (1), 67–69 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2835162

Obituaries

In Special Collection: Print Obituaries
Physics Today 61 (1), 71 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2835163

Correction

Physics Today 61 (1), 75 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2835166

Quick Study

Physics Today 61 (1), 76–77 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2835167

The system of conduits found in a tree is far larger and more complex than any human-constructed microfluidic system.

Back Scatter

Physics Today 61 (1), 100 (2008); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2835134
Close Modal

or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal