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Issues

From the Editor

Physics Today 60 (10), 8 (2007); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2800109

Reference Frame

Physics Today 60 (10), 10–11 (2007); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2800253

For six years before he retired last year, David Mermin taught quantum computation to Cornell University students of computer science. Google “CS483” for his lecture notes, where everything that he says can easily be shown is shown easily.

Letters

Physics Today 60 (10), 12 (2007); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2800077
Physics Today 60 (10), 12–14 (2007); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2800078
Physics Today 60 (10), 12 (2007); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4797442
Physics Today 60 (10), 14 (2007); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2800079
Physics Today 60 (10), 14–15 (2007); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2800080
Physics Today 60 (10), 15–16 (2007); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2800081
Physics Today 60 (10), 16 (2007); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2800082
Physics Today 60 (10), 16 (2007); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2800083
Physics Today 60 (10), 16–17 (2007); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2800084
Physics Today 60 (10), 17 (2007); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2800085
Physics Today 60 (10), 17 (2007); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2800086
Physics Today 60 (10), 17 (2007); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4797443
Physics Today 60 (10), 17 (2007); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4797444

Search and Discovery

Physics Today 60 (10), 18–20 (2007); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2800087

The solar system oscillates through the Milky Way's midplane with a period of about 60 million years. That cyclic excursion might be causing periodic fivefold increases in Earth's exposure to extragalactic cosmic rays.

Physics Today 60 (10), 20–23 (2007); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2800088

Analysis of the time-resolved disorder in hydrocarbon molecules indicates that heat propagates ballistically.

Physics Today 60 (10), 24 (2007); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2800089

Physics Update

Physics Today 60 (10), 26 (2007); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2800246
Physics Today 60 (10), 26 (2007); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4797445
Physics Today 60 (10), 26 (2007); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4797446
Physics Today 60 (10), 26 (2007); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4797447

Issues and Events

Physics Today 60 (10), 28–30 (2007); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2800090

Three-dimensional mapping of starling flocks could shed light not only on the birds' collective behavior but also on a broad range of other aggregate systems.

Physics Today 60 (10), 30–32 (2007); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2800091

High-intensity beams of rare particles could give Fermilab a vibrant scientific program if delays in the International Linear Collider spell a dry period for the lab.

Physics Today 60 (10), 31 (2007); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2800092
Physics Today 60 (10), 32 (2007); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2800093
Physics Today 60 (10), 32–33 (2007); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2800094
Physics Today 60 (10), 33 (2007); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2800095
Physics Today 60 (10), 33 (2007); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4797448

Articles

Physics Today 60 (10), 35–40 (2007); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2800252

Controlling the production of debris is crucial to the sustainable use of space. But even without additional launches, let alone antisatellite tests, the amount of debris orbiting Earth will continue to increase far into the future.

Physics Today 60 (10), 42–47 (2007); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2800096

Icy solids in Earth's permafrost and deep ocean basins store an enormous reservoir of natural gas. That reservoir, and scientists' efforts to synthesize related molecular-storage compounds, may help solve our energy problems.

Physics Today 60 (10), 48–53 (2007); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2800097

The field of surface physics is evolving to include molecular-scale studies of nanoparticle surfaces, as well as single-crystal surfaces in contact with liquids or high-pressure gases.

Books

Physics Today 60 (10), 55 (2007); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2800098
Physics Today 60 (10), 55–56 (2007); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2800099
Physics Today 60 (10), 56–57 (2007); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2800100
Physics Today 60 (10), 57–58 (2007); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2800101
Physics Today 60 (10), 58–59 (2007); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2800102
Physics Today 60 (10), 60–61 (2007); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2800103
Physics Today 60 (10), 61–66 (2007); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2800104

New Products

Physics Today 60 (10), 68–69 (2007); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2800105

Obituaries

In Special Collection: Print Obituaries
Physics Today 60 (10), 72–75 (2007); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2800106
In Special Collection: Print Obituaries
Physics Today 60 (10), 75–76 (2007); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2800107

Quick Study

Physics Today 60 (10), 78–79 (2007); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2800108

The simplest wavelet transform is based on sums and differences of nearby points in a function. A variety of sophisticated variations allow signals and images to be effectively compressed, cleaned, and analyzed.

Back Scatter

Physics Today 60 (10), 112 (2007); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2800076
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