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Physics Update

Physics Today 52 (6), 9 (1999); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2802791

Letters

Physics Today 52 (6), 11–13 (1999); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.882693
Physics Today 52 (6), 13–15 (1999); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.882686
Physics Today 52 (6), 15–83 (1999); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.882688
Physics Today 52 (6), 83–84 (1999); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.882713
Physics Today 52 (6), 84 (1999); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.882715
Physics Today 52 (6), 84 (1999); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.882716

Search and Discovery

Physics Today 52 (6), 17–18 (1999); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.882709

Magnetic measurements suggest that a process akin to Earth's seafloor spreading once operated on Mars.

Physics Today 52 (6), 18–19 (1999); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.882690

A new design efficiently converts heat into useful work without any moving parts.

Physics Today 52 (6), 19–21 (1999); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.882691

You can control the flow of electrons in a quantum dot by cyclic changes in the wavefunction.

Physics Today 52 (6), 21–23 (1999); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.882694

If you can measure a parts‐per‐million parity violation in the elastic scattering of electrons off protons with enough precision, you get to look at the strangeness structure of the proton. These demanding experiments are under way at accelerators old and new.

Articles

Physics Today 52 (6), 24–30 (1999); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.882692

Quantum computers have the potential to do certain calculations faster than any foreseeable classical computers, but their success will depend on preserving complex coherent quantum states. Recent discoveries have shown us how to do that.

Physics Today 52 (6), 33–38 (1999); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.882695

Using ultrafast laser pulses and magnetic fields, electron‐hole pairs in semiconductors may be carefully manipulated, and electron spin states can be preserved over surprisingly long times and distances.

Physics Today 52 (6), 40–46 (1999); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.882697

A resurgence of theoretical and observational interest in black holes has given new impetus to the study of these intriguing objects.

Washington Reports

Physics Today 52 (6), 49–51 (1999); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.882698
Physics Today 52 (6), 50–51 (1999); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2802792

Physics Community

Physics Today 52 (6), 53–54 (1999); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.882696
Physics Today 52 (6), 54–55 (1999); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.882700
Physics Today 52 (6), 55–56 (1999); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2802793
Physics Today 52 (6), 55 (1999); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.882701
Physics Today 52 (6), 56 (1999); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.882702
Physics Today 52 (6), 56–57 (1999); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.882703
Physics Today 52 (6), 57 (1999); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2802794
Physics Today 52 (6), 57 (1999); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2802795

Books

Physics Today 52 (6), 59 (1999); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.882704
Physics Today 52 (6), 59–60 (1999); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.882705
Physics Today 52 (6), 60–62 (1999); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.882699
Physics Today 52 (6), 62 (1999); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.882706
Physics Today 52 (6), 62–64 (1999); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.882707
Physics Today 52 (6), 64–69 (1999); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2802796
Physics Today 52 (6), 64 (1999); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.882708

New Products

Physics Today 52 (6), 71–74 (1999); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2802797

Obituaries

Physics Today 52 (6), 77–78 (1999); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2802798
Physics Today 52 (6), 78–79 (1999); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.882711
Physics Today 52 (6), 79–80 (1999); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.882712

We Hear That

Physics Today 52 (6), 77 (1999); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.882710
Physics Today 52 (6), 77 (1999); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.882717
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