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Issues

Reference Frame

Physics Today 46 (6), 9–11 (1993); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2808925

Letters

Physics Today 46 (6), 13–15 (1993); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2808926
Physics Today 46 (6), 15–106 (1993); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2808927
Physics Today 46 (6), 106–107 (1993); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2808944
Physics Today 46 (6), 107 (1993); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2808945
Physics Today 46 (6), 107 (1993); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2808946
Physics Today 46 (6), 107–108 (1993); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2808947
Physics Today 46 (6), 108 (1993); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2808948

Search and Discovery

Physics Today 46 (6), 17–19 (1993); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2808928

Articles

Physics Today 46 (6), 22–23 (1993); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.881351

Man‐made semiconductor nanostructures provide us with new ways to investigate condensed matter under conditions of reduced dimensionality and could revolutionize optoelectronic technology.

Physics Today 46 (6), 24–32 (1993); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.881352

Luminescence and inelastic light scattering provide new ways to study the properties of a two‐dimensional electron gas and have recently shed light on the collective states responsible for the fractional quantum Hall effect.

Physics Today 46 (6), 34–42 (1993); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.881353

Optical experiments in semiconductor superlattices in electric fields hove shown the existence of a long debated quantum mechanical phenomenon, bringing us closer to demonstrating an extremely fast emitter of radiation.

Physics Today 46 (6), 46–52 (1993); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.881354

Experimenters and theorists have combined two new and productive fields of physics—nonlinear optics and quantum confinement—to reveal a host of unusual and useful properties in semiconductor heterostructures.

Physics Today 46 (6), 56–63 (1993); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.881355

Arrays of nanometer potential wells, fabricated at semiconductor interfaces, exhibit infrared absorption lines reminiscent of atoms, molecules and even crystal lattices.

Physics Today 46 (6), 66–73 (1993); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.881356

A new generation of optical microresonators is making possible the exploration of quantum electrodynamic phenomena in condensed matter systems and providing microlasers with a wide range of potential applications.

Physics Community

Physics Today 46 (6), 75–79 (1993); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2808929
Physics Today 46 (6), 79 (1993); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2808930
Physics Today 46 (6), 80 (1993); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2808931
Physics Today 46 (6), 80 (1993); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2808932

Washington Reports

Physics Today 46 (6), 83–89 (1993); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2808933
Physics Today 46 (6), 89–91 (1993); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2808934
Physics Today 46 (6), 91 (1993); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2808935

Books

Physics Today 46 (6), 93 (1993); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2808936
Physics Today 46 (6), 94 (1993); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2808937
Physics Today 46 (6), 94–95 (1993); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2808938
Physics Today 46 (6), 95–97 (1993); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2808939
Physics Today 46 (6), 97–99 (1993); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2808940
Physics Today 46 (6), 99–100 (1993); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2808941
Physics Today 46 (6), 100–101 (1993); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2808942

New Products

Physics Today 46 (6), 103–105 (1993); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2808943

We Hear That

Physics Today 46 (6), 109 (1993); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2808949
Physics Today 46 (6), 110 (1993); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2808950

Obituaries

Physics Today 46 (6), 110–111 (1993); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2808951
Physics Today 46 (6), 111 (1993); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2808952
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