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Issues

Letters

Physics Today 42 (2), 9–13 (1989); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2810898
Physics Today 42 (2), 13–15 (1989); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2810899
Physics Today 42 (2), 15 (1989); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2810900
Physics Today 42 (2), 15–123 (1989); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2810901
Physics Today 42 (2), 123–126 (1989); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2810915
Physics Today 42 (2), 126 (1989); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2810916

Search and Discovery

Physics Today 42 (2), 17–18 (1989); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2810902

Articles

Physics Today 42 (2), 22–23 (1989); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.881188
Physics Today 42 (2), 24–28 (1989); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.881189

How a 21‐year‐old grad student met this 28‐year‐old assistant prof and went on to amaze the kids, wreak havoc in the lab and invent a new way to understand quantum mechanics.

Physics Today 42 (2), 32–38 (1989); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.881190

Personal letters written about Feynman when he was a young professor at Cornell recount his adventures with friends and paint a picture of a uniquely brilliant physicist.

Physics Today 42 (2), 42–48 (1989); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.881191

A youthful fascination with electrodynamics drove Feynman through a succession of ideas until, with a prod by experiment, he reached an intuitive view of quantum electrodynamics.

Physics Today 42 (2), 50–54 (1989); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.881192

A brilliant, vital and amusing neighbor, Feynman was a stimulating (if sometimes exasperating) partner in discussions of profound issues. His sum‐over‐paths method may turn out to be not just useful, but fundamental.

Physics Today 42 (2), 56–59 (1989); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.881193

‘I am more sure of the conclusions [of the parton model] than of any single argument which suggested them to me for they have an internal consistency which surprises me and exceeds the consistency of my deductive arguments which hinted at their existence.’

Physics Today 42 (2), 61–66 (1989); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.881194

During the mid‐1950s Feynman's interests concentrated on problems in condensed matter, including liquid helium, rotons, polarons and superconductivity.

Physics Today 42 (2), 70–75 (1989); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.881195

His achievement as a teacher—and as an inspiration and model for other teachers—was based on nothing less than seeing all of physics with fresh new eyes.

Physics Today 42 (2), 78–83 (1989); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.881196

In his last years, Feynman helped build an innovative computer. He had great fun with computers. Half the fun was explaining things to anyone who would listen.

Physics Today 42 (2), 85–88 (1989); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.881197

Feynman's theoretical concepts opened up research opportunities for experimenters, and his approach to physics dignified the role played by their work.

Physics Today 42 (2), 86 (1989); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2810903
Physics Today 42 (2), 88 (1989); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2810904

Washington Reports

Physics Today 42 (2), 91–95 (1989); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2810905
Physics Today 42 (2), 92 (1989); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2810906
Physics Today 42 (2), 95–98 (1989); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2810907

Physics Community

Physics Today 42 (2), 101 (1989); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2810908
Physics Today 42 (2), 101–102 (1989); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2810909
Physics Today 42 (2), 102 (1989); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2810910

Books

Physics Today 42 (2), 105–106 (1989); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2810911
Physics Today 42 (2), 106–107 (1989); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2810912
Physics Today 42 (2), 107–116 (1989); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2810913

New Products

Physics Today 42 (2), 119–121 (1989); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2810914
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