In 1932, shortly after the founding of Reviews of Modern Physics (RMP), nuclear physics became a scientific discipline with the discovery of the neutron. In the ensuing five years, the field had grown to an extent that justified the 450-page, monumental three-part review in RMP by Hans Bethe and his collaborators.1 Nicknamed Bethe’s Bible, it covered not only the new phenomena revealed by nuclear reactions and beta decay, but also a theory of nuclear forces, which would later explain nuclear shells, and various experimental findings.

Compared with that early review, the scope of nuclear physics today is enormous. The field deals with the structure of hadrons and nuclei, nuclear matter at extreme densities, nuclear astrophysics, and symmetry tests involving all the fundamental forces of nature.2 As illustrated by selected examples below, articles in RMP have played a uniquely important role in shaping the agenda of nuclear...

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