In creating a single governance structure for two linear collider projects, particle-physics leaders hope to avoid redundant R&D, unify the broader community, and increase the odds that a next-generation collider is actually realized. The timing of the merger is driven by the impending expiration of the International Committee for Future Accelerators oversight body for the International Linear Collider (ILC); the merged governing body would also be chartered under ICFA.

The ILC, which is distributed among many labs, and the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC), centered at CERN, are both global projects that would smash electrons and positrons into each other at TeV collision energies. The two projects have the same physics goals, says Johns Hopkins University’s Jonathan Bagger, who chairs the ICFA steering committee for the ILC. “But they have different technologies, different time scales, different energy extensibility, and different strengths and weaknesses.” Ballpark estimates put either machine in the multibillion-dollar...

You do not currently have access to this content.