In 1937 I. I. Rabi described the fundamental theory for magnetic resonance experiments in his great paper “Space Quantization in a Gyrating Magnetic Field.” This theory stimulated many subsequent developments, including molecular‐beam magnetic resonance, radiofrequency spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, masers and atomic clocks. Its imprint now stamps a tremendous range of experimental techniques and technological applications.

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