Asteroids that orbit the Sun in a belt between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter are well known. A few other asteroids cross Earth's orbit, and, from time to time, one collides with our planet, as figure 1 so clearly indicates. What are they made of? How did they originate? We suspect that material much like the asteroids played a part in the origin of the solar system—can we see similar forces at work elsewhere?

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