Ever since the initial successes of the theory of relativity, physicists and philosophers of science have written a great deal about a paradox that seems to arise when theory tries to answer the question: If two identical stationary clocks in the same inertial frame of reference are synchronized, and if one of them is accelerated away into different inertial frames and then returned to the original inertial frame, would the time readings of the clocks still be synchronized at this later rendezvous?

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