THE WIRE SPARK CHAMBER is emerging as one of the dominant instruments for high‐energy research. Usually a part of a larger system involving other particle detectors and computers, it is relatively inexpensive and can be easily replaced or exchanged in an experiment. The high rate at which it collects data permits the simultaneous study of several different reactions of similar topology. It is also being introduced into other fields where it is necessary to measure the trajectory of a charged particle quickly and accurately.

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