Since the days of the Enlightenment, if not before, there has been a tendency among writers of all kinds to comment on the differences between science and the humanities. Recently the expression of that tendency acquired a new feature in the form of the suggestion that, instead of threatening the security of theological doctrine or of metaphysical concepts, science is threatening to divide what traditionally has been a cultural unity within the western world.

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