Laser beam diagnostic devices have been used extensively in laboratory environments and in process development work ever since the evolution of laser technology began. However, industrial laser users have had to rely on basic instruments and measurement techniques in order to assess the state of their lasers. Recent product introductions have gone a long way in breaking the barrier between the laboratory and the shop floor. Some of these new devices are compact and low cost with simple user friendly interfaces that can be used by the average machine operator.

Some enlightened users are now looking to greater levels of beam monitoring to assist in preventive maintenance schedules, as a tool to maintain product quality and even for on-line and in-line beam monitoring applications to provide input to process control.

1.
L
Green
Process monitoring of industrial CO2 lasers - Current state of technology
”,
Advanced Laser Applications Conference ALAC
2004
,
Ann Arbor, USA
.
2.
.
J
Gabzdyl
 et al “
Nozzle beam alignment for laser cutting
Proc 6ᵗʰ Int Conf on Applications of Lasers and Electro-optics
, ICALEO87 Nov
1987
,
San Diego USA
.
3.
M
Sparkes
 et al “
In process laser beam diagnostics
Int Conf on Applications of Lasers and Electro-Optics ICALEO 02
, Oct
2002
Scottsdale, USA
.
4.
M
Sparkes
&
W
O’Neill
On-line beam measurement of critical laser beam properties
”.
Int Conf on Applications of Lasers and Electro-Optics
. ICALEO
2003
,
Jacksonville USA
.
5.
W
O’Neill
Adding intelligence to laser processing
”.
Industrial Laser Solutions
, June
2004
.
6.
L
Green
Laser profiling and monitoring
”.
Industrial Laser Solutions
November
2004
7.
G
Parkin
 et al “
Flight Tube purging with nitrogen to maintain CO2 laser performance
Int Conf on Applications of Lasers and Electro-Optics ICALEO
1998
Orlando USA
.
This content is only available via PDF.
You do not currently have access to this content.