Previous research [B. Munson, Linguist. Soc. Am. (2005)] showed that listeners rate self‐identified gay/lesbian/bisexual (GLB) talkers as more‐GLB sounding than self‐identified heterosexual talkers when listening to readings of single words in isolation. In this investigation, we examine relationships among measures of perceived sexual orientation (PSO) and two other perceptual measures made from the same talkers’ speech, perceived height and perceived speech clarity. Ratings were collected from three independent groups of listeners. Regression analyses showed that approximately 80% of the variance in PSO of women’s voices was predicted by measures of perceived clarity (women rated as speaking more clearly were more likely to be rated as heterosexual‐sounding than women rated as speaking less clearly) and perceived height (women rated as sounding tall were more likely to be rated as GLB‐sounding than women rated to sound short). In contrast, 50% of the variance in men’s sexual orientation was predicted by measures of perceived clarity (men rated as speaking more clearly were more likely to be rated as GLB‐sounding than men rated as speaking less clearly). These results suggest that ratings of PSO from speech may be mediated by judgments of other parameters that are robustly coded in short samples of speech.