The study of vocalization brings together a long history of voice terminology from acoustics, linguistics, phonetics, speech pathology, laryngology, music, theater, biology, and speech technology. One challenge is to maintain consistency in symbolic representation of key variables used for resonant frequencies of the airways and the frequencies produced by sound sources. Scientists who use mathematical notation are encouraged to use single letters with subscripts for algebraic clarity (Cohen and Giacomo, 1987), whereas clinicians often prefer multiple-letter abbreviations without subscripts for ease of written and spoken communication. For example, the symbol fo as the fundamental frequency of oscillation of the vocal folds has been used in thousands of publications, both with upper case and lower case letters, and both with subscript and no subscript. If capitalized, the symbol is not clearly dissociated from formant frequencies F1, F2, …, Fn. The subscript of...

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