A 40‐w electrodeless rubidium light source is described which emits a total of 13 w in the two D lines. The intensity is a factor of 50 larger than that of a previously reported electrodeless rubidium source. In addition, high stability, long life, minimum noise, and the absence of self‐reversal make it attractive for optical pumping studies of alkali metal vapors.

1.
W. E.
Bell
,
A. L.
Bloom
, and
J.
Lynch
,
Rev. Sci. Instr.
32
,
688
(
1961
).
2.
NBS preferred circuit No. 5, Handbook Preferred Circuit, NAVAER 16‐1‐519, Supplement No. 1 (1958); power supply circuit modified to operate up to 385 v dc at 150 ma.
3.
The optical pumping signals refer to the Rb85 Zeeman resonances which were observed by the transmission monitoring technique. The method and the experimental details are fully described in the paper by
L. W.
Anderson
,
F. M.
Pipkin
, and
J. C.
Baird
,
Phys. Rev.
120
,
1279
(
1960
).
4.
A. Bloom, Proceedings of the Ann Arbor Conference on Optical Pumping (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 1959), p. 116.
5.
N.
Carleton
and
O.
Oldenberg
,
J. Opt. Soc. Am.
47
,
985
(
1957
).
6.
Footnote added in proof. However, relaxation oscillations have been observed when the lamp is driven too hard. When the rubidium vapor pressure becomes excessive, the load impedance rises and the bulb begins to cool. With cooling, the load impedance drops and the cycle repeats itself with a duration dependent on the thermal time constant of the bulb. The problem is avoided by operating at lower power levels or by more efficient removal of heat from the bulb.
7.
A. C. G. Mitchell and M. W. Zemansky, Resonance Radiation and Excited Atoms (Cambridge University Press, London, 1934).
8.
The Eppley Laboratory, Inc., Newport, Rhode Island.
9.
Spectrolab, Inc., North Hollywood, California.
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