Geiger‐Müller tubes have been constructed which use visibly transparent nonmetallic electrically conducting films as cathodes. These tubes have the following advantages: (1) a long plateau; (2) no photosensitivity; (3) an almost indefinite operating life; (4) immunity from damage arising from heavy discharges; (5) straightforward filling procedure devoid of any ``passivising'' or saturating techniques; (6) good response to ionizing radiation throughout the length of the counter; (7) freedom from use of critical materials such as copper or stainless steel No. 446 which require special cleaning and polishing procedures.

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