A phenomenological treatment is given for the fluid dynamics and thermodynamics of strongly polarizable magnetic fluid continua in the presence of nonuniform magnetic fields. Examples of the fluids treated here have only recently been synthesized in the laboratory. It is found that vorticity may be generated by thermomagnetic interaction even in the absence of viscosity and this leads to the development of augmented Bernoulli relationships. An illustration of a free‐surface problem of static equilibrium is confirmed by experiment and information is obtained regarding a fluid's magnetic susceptibility. Another illustration elucidates the mechanism of an energy conversion technique. Finally, an analytical solution is found for the problem of source flow with heat addition in order to display the thermomagnetic and magnetomechanical effects attendant to simultaneous heat addition and fluid motion in the presence of a magnetic field.

1.
E. L.
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2.
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5.
R. M. Bozorth, Ferrormagnetism (D. Van Nostrand Company, Inc., New York, 1951), p. 714.
6.
In extremely high fields, the magnetization continues to increase sensibly at all temperatures. The effect is most pronounced near the Curie temperature.
7.
W. Voigt, Lehrbuch der Kristallphysik, (B. G. Teubner, Leipzig, 1928).
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W. F.
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9.
S. Goldstein, Modern Developments in Fluid Mechanics (Clarendon Press, Oxford, England, 1938), Vol. I, p. 99.
10.
See R. J. Seeger in Handbook of Physics, edited by E. U. Condon and H. Odishaw (McGraw‐Hill Book Company, Inc., New York, 1958), Pt. 3, Chap. 2, p. 14.
11.
For a discussion of the various definitions and means of determining Curie temperatures see, for example, R. M. Bozorth, Ref. 5, p. 716.
12.
E. T. Whittaker and G. H. Watson, Modern Analysis (The Macmillan Company, New York, 1946), p. 373.
13.
E. T. Whittaker and G. N. Watson, Ref. 12, pp. 373–374.
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