The existence of the alternating potentials which Debye predicted should accompany the passage of ultrasonic waves through an electrolytic solution has been established experimentally by means of a stationary acoustical field. The effect has been shown (i) to depend on velocity variations within the ultrasonic waves, (ii) to be a function of the electrolyte, and (iii) to be independent of concentration for practical purposes in the range 0.005 to 0.0005 molar for uni‐univalent electrolytes. These characteristics are in agreement with theoretical considerations.

1.
P.
Debye
,
J. Chem. Phys.
1
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13
(
1933
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2.
A more exact form of this equation has been developed in the first paper of this series—
Bugosh
,
Yeager
, and
Hovorka
,
J. Chem. Phys.
15
,
592
(
1947
).
3.
Although unable to detect the effect for electrolytes, Rutgers and his co‐workers have found a similar effect for a colloidal suspension.
A.
Rutgers
,
Physica
5
,
46
(
1938
);
A.
Rutgers
,
Nature
157
,
74
(
1946
);
J.
Vidts
,
Koninkl. Vlaamsche Acad, voor Wetenschappen
7
,
5
(
1945
).
4.
Theoretically a plate which is one‐half wave‐length (in brass) or 0.66 cm thick should transmit the ultrasonic waves with maximum efficiency. Experimentally, a slightly thicker plate 0.72 cm was found to be more efficient.
5.
L.
King
,
Proc. Roy. Soc. London
147
,
212
(
1934
);
F.
Fox
,
J. Acous. Soc. Am.
12
,
147
(
1946
).
6.
The Debye effect itself will be useful for the determination of the velocity amplitude of ultrasonic waves in liquids. Figure 4 demonstrates the utilization of the effect for exploring complex fields within cylindrical acoustical elements.
7.
The fundamental frequency was checked by means of beating the nineteenth harmonic against the 5‐mc carrier of WWV, the National Bureau of Standards station in Washington, D.C. Frequency stability was of prime importance since even small frequency changes would alter the nature of the acoustical field within the sonic cell.
8.
The hydrogen electrode effect will be considered mathematically in the next paper in this series.
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