A flash method of measuring the thermal diffusivity, heat capacity, and thermal conductivity is described for the first time. A high‐intensity short‐duration light pulse is absorbed in the front surface of a thermally insulated specimen a few millimeters thick coated with camphor black, and the resulting temperature history of the rear surface is measured by a thermocouple and recorded with an oscilloscope and camera. The thermal diffusivity is determined by the shape of the temperature versus time curve at the rear surface, the heat capacity by the maximum temperature indicated by the thermocouple, and the thermal conductivity by the product of the heat capacity, thermal diffusivity, and the density. These three thermal properties are determined for copper, silver, iron, nickel, aluminum, tin, zinc, and some alloys at 22°C and 135°C and compared with previously reported values.

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