Awareness of the climate changes and the problems in the supply of fossil fuels because of the war are also a challenge for the construction sector. The availability of renewable energy sources on site is limited and it is particularly problematic in the densely built-up areas of city centres and historic neighbourhoods – we see this as a challenge. Passive measures, including the passive use of solar energy, are the first step in reducing dependence of our buildings on non-renewable energies. In dense urban environment, the solar envelope methodology makes sense, and the mutual shading of buildings significantly affects thermal comfort in winter as well as in summer. The availability of solar rays influences the use and efficiency of the photovoltaic systems, where several prejudices need to be overcome. Dense urban structure also brings specifics to the use of energy of the environment, whether passively or through heat pumps. In this context, it is important to optimize the use of energy obtained from renewable sources, to offer its storage for later consumption and the possible use in another sector (sector coupling). This interconnection of sectors is related to several "smart" concepts: smart city, smart grid, smart mobility. Our research focuses on the analysis of these interrelationships, on the specifics of the use of RES in dense urban development and on the considerations of the effects of climate change on the urban environment in terms of energy efficiency, human comfort, biodiversity protection and risk minimization. Our vision is a sustainable city with an emphasis on our cultural sustainability, preserving the image of the city in changing conditions.

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