Teaching skills are skills that must be possessed by prospective chemistry teachers. The subject that is held to develop these skills is micro-teaching. This course is held in practice, which are teacher students doing teaching practice. Learning about how to teach requires feedback, coaching to monitor and improve teaching performance. The purpose of this study is to determine whether there are differences in scores of teacher students’ teaching skills between those given class feedback and individual feedback. This study used a quasi-experimental method. The research design used was a nonequivalent control group design. The research sample was determined by purposive sampling technique, 58 teacher students taking micro-teaching courses in the academic year 2017/2018 were divided into two classes, the first class was given class feedback and the second class was given individual feedback. The research instrument was in the form of teaching performance assessment sheets. This assessment sheet was validated by a colleague and was declared eligible for use. Teaching skills assessment was carried out twice when the first practice was taught and the last practice. Increased student achievements as indicated by scores of teaching that were analyzed using normalized gain scores. Hypothesis testing uses independents sample t-test because the data are normal and homogeneous. Hypothesis test results showed there were no differences in scores of teaching skills between teacher students who were given class feedback and teacher students who were given individual feedback. Teacher students who were given class feedback, as well as individual feedback, experienced an increase in teaching skills scores with medium criteria.

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