Imagine an introductory physics laboratory where students are fully engaged in applying their understanding of mechanics concepts to launch a water balloon through a hole in a piece of plywood surrounded by sharp pins. The water balloon is “Tarzan,” swinging from a cotton thread “vine” into the plywood “cave” surrounded by “sharp rocks” (the pins). By reversing the conventional laboratory sequence of events, the Tarzan Swing active-learning laboratories were amongst the first to “flip the classroom” to engage and excite students. Problems are first solved theoretically outside of the laboratory, then the solutions are verified physically inside the laboratory. Failure engenders reanalysis; success brings cheers. Students often work overtime eagerly to achieve success.1 Most importantly, this flipped classroom approach can improve learning and retention for students throughout STEM education.2 

The Tarzan Swing Active-Learning Laboratories were introduced to the physics education world at an American Association of Physics Teachers...

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