In late 2016, Research Supporting Multisensory Engagement by Blind, Visually Impaired, and Sighted Students to Advance Integrated Learning of Astronomy and Computer Science [also known as Innovators Developing Accessible Tools for Astronomy (IDATA)] was funded by the National Science Foundation. IDATA explored the role of computational thinking in astronomy. Our approach partnered blind and visually impaired (BVI) and sighted middle and high school students and their teachers with undergraduate students, software engineers, astronomers, educators, and education researchers to, in part, design and develop a new BVI-accessible image analysis software tool called Afterglow Access (AgA). The goal of the IDATA project is to allow all users, regardless of visual acuity or level of astronomy knowledge, to collect and analyze their own astronomical images.

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