Interactive classroom demonstrations (ICDs) are used extensively in physics, and prior studies indicate that, when conducted under certain conditions, they lead to appreciable increases in student gains and retention. The literature suggests that the ICD recipe for maximizing student gain is to i) introduce the physical theory that will be demonstrated, ii) describe the demonstration and prompt students to record a prediction for what will happen, iii) conduct the demonstration, and iv) return to the prediction for students to reconcile their hypotheses. Here, I propose two interrelated updates to leverage the particular strengths of Generation Z students currently enrolled in introductory physics courses as well as to address potential pitfalls in the canonical ICD recipe: the inclusion of simple, yet flashy demonstrations, and the integration of social media to disseminate and further engage with the results.

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