Students experience current electricity every day in our wired world, yet the circuit problems that students work through in physics class can seem far removed from the common experience of switching on a light bulb. However, current electricity provides many opportunities to engage students in hands-on learning. Through circuit construction, students can begin to visualize what can’t be seen—the flow of electrons through a wire.

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3.
A challenging aspect of this project is explaining to students what it means for the circuits to be
“an integral part of the gameplay.” Students will propose a game where the winner switches on a light after they win, yet this does not satisfy the requirements of the circuits being required to play the game
.
4.
It is recommended to have as many soldering stations as the number of groups working in the room at once.
5.
This represents the circuitry requirements for the non-honors level ninth-grade introductory course. The difficulty of this project is easily adjusted by altering the circuitry requirements.
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