The conical pendulum is a classic introductory physics problem for teaching circular motion—a topic about which students frequently carry alternative conceptions. As teachers provide lessons to untangle these conceptions, it is good to allow students to practice their new knowledge in varied settings. This is one possible experiment that builds off the conical pendulum. The experiment can be modified to fit the level of complexity the instructor wishes to pursue. Although the context of this article is about the physics of the amusement park flying carousel swing, the analysis techniques discussed can be used in a variety of situations.

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A free online protractor can be found at
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