The phenomenon of the “howling wind” is very well known to many. It occurs as strong winds whip around bare tree branches and electrical transmission lines. This phenomenon has been known for a long time and was used to make music with the ancient Aeolian harp. We can create this sound in the lab by swinging sticks quickly through the air. A short characteristic “howl” is produced; the frequencies present depend upon the swinging speed and the diameter of the rod.

4.
K. U.
Ingard
,
Fundamentals of Waves and Oscillations
(
Cambridge University Press
,
New York
,
1998
).
6.
V.
Strouhal
, “
Ueber eine besondere Art der Tonerregung
,”
Annalen der Physik und Chemie
241
,
216
251
(
1878
), https://ogy.de/Strouhal.
7.
Frank M.
White
,
Fluid Mechanics
, 4th ed. (
McGraw-Hill
,
1999
).
8.
N. D.
Katopodes
,
Free-Surface Flow – Environmental Fluid Dynamics
(
Elsevier Inc.
,
2019
).
AAPT members receive access to The Physics Teacher and the American Journal of Physics as a member benefit. To learn more about this member benefit and becoming an AAPT member, visit the Joining AAPT page.