In conventional physics teaching, acceleration measurement is demonstrated using motion sensors and carts on inclined tracks, and relevant data are collected using specific professional software. This approach entails the connection of computers and interface boxes, and requires high cost and large space. Air-track carts can be used to perform these experiments to reduce the errors caused by track friction; however, this approach has various disadvantages, including a large-size track and an air blower connecting to the track. In recent years, Arduino microcontrollers have gradually served as tools and platforms commonly used by makers and applied in STEM education. In addition, smartphones have been popular among most high school and university students. Therefore, various physics experiments have been performed using Arduino microcontrollers and smartphones. This study improved the weaknesses of conventional motion sensors for measuring the acceleration of objects on inclined planes by utilizing Arduino microcontrollers and smartphones. Specifically, common steel balls and U-shaped aluminum strips were used to replace the carts and tracks in relevant experiments. A readily available Arduino development board, smartphone app, and electronic components were also used to record and analyze the experimental data. Accordingly, a user-friendly tool for teaching acceleration measurement was created. This tool is small, light, portable, inexpensive, easily assembled, and yields small experimental errors, facilitating students’ participation in hands-on activities and demonstrations of textbook theories.

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