Many high schools, two-year colleges, and universities offer a conceptual physics course for non-science students who have to take a basic science course. The students often enter the course unmotivated and may eventually withdraw. So, how do we make the course interesting enough for these students to gain the knowledge we desire and, more importantly, develop an appreciation for the role of science in society? A possible answer may lie in the approach to the material. Students who can relate to the topics in the course tend to be more motivated and acquire a greater understanding of the material. This is part of the approach to active learning programs such as SENCER and SCALE- UP. Courses in Introductory Physics for the Life Sciences (IPLS) using focused topics have also been offered. This paper suggests ways to structure a course around “real-life” topics in teaching a full set of mechanics concepts. The “practical approach” consists of building the course material around topics with which the students are familiar. Courses designed around practical applications can provide an effective strategy for engagement and learning. These elements are appropriate for both high school and college non-major courses.

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, “
Active learning approach using real life examples
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See for example: https://safety.lovetoknow.com/20_Safety_Tips_for_Driving, or the following winter driving safety video can be paused to discuss each of the 11 safety tips and how physics explains why they make sense: “
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Climate references for detailed analyses of effects around the world: Global Climate Change: Vital Signs of the Planet, NASA, https://climate.nasa.gov/ and “Climate change,” Britannica, https://www.britannica.com/science/climate-change. The latter has a good explanation of climate change and an introduction to the basic related concepts.
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