When authoring physics problems, professors may develop an intuition for how much information they need to provide such that the problem has a unique answer and is not over constrained. It is an open question as to whether using intuition leads to a sufficiently broad range of problems. In this paper we discuss a systematic way of authoring problems to guarantee that problems are fully constrained and that all possible variations of certain classes of problems are explored.

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Readers can view Appendix I at TPT Online,http://10.1119/10.0003468, under the Supplemental tab.

Supplementary Material

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