The NASA public archives present a vast resource of authentic satellite data that research astronomers have tapped into for decades. Recently, the same data analysis tools used by professional astronomers have been adapted into a browser-based interface called JS9 for easy use by any interested student. Tutorials and classroom-ready activities that explore many deep sky objects in depth have also been generated. JS9 affords a unique, platform-independent introduction to the world of astronomical observation with no cost to anyone. It presents a virtual-classroom-ready approach that can be utilized anywhere, at any time, at home or anywhere that internet connectivity is available. Its predecessor, DS9, is still used extensively and is available as a desktop application.

2.
JS9: Astronomical Image Display Everywhere, https://js9.si.edu/.
3.
Detailed tutorials and classroom-ready activities can be found at https://chandra.si.edu/js9/ (click on “JS9” near the bottom of the page) or https://www.physics.rutgers.edu/~matilsky/js9/.
5.
Flexible Image Transport System (FITS), defined in
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6.
K. J.
Borkowski
,
P.
Gwynne
,
S. P.
Reynolds
,
D. A.
Green
,
U.
Hwang
,
R.
Petre
, and
R.
Willett
, “
Asymmetric expansion of the youngest galactic supernova remnant G1.9+0.3
” (
2017
), https://arxiv.org/abs/1702.06555.
7.
Dan
Milisavljevic
and
Robert A.
Fesen
, “
The supernova—Supernova remnant connection
” (
2017
), https://arxiv.org/abs/1701.00891.
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