Smartphones and their internal sensors offer new options for an experimental access to teach physics at secondary schools and universities. Especially in the field of mechanics, a number of smartphone-based experiments are known illustrating, e.g., linear and pendulum motions as well as rotational motions using the internal MEMS accelerometer and gyroscope, respectively.

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We used the mass and the dimensions given from the technical data sheet by Apple Inc., https://www.apple.com/de/iphone/compare/.
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