Some educators use what we call a “hook” as a key element in their lessons. We use “hooks” to get our students interested in what it is we are teaching. Many teachers have adopted the Next Generation Science Standards and establish the phenomena as the engine that drives scientific investigation and learning in the classroom. We use phenomena to illustrate the melding of real-world scientific investigation, research, and practices with science teaching found in middle and high school settings. Interested students are more motivated, curious, and attentive. This increases the likelihood that they will not only learn the material to a greater degree, but also retain the information longer. A wider variety and volume of phenomena provides more hooks, which in turn increases the instructor’s ability to deliver an engaging lesson that immerses students in the core ideas of the scientific process.

1.
NGSS Lead States
,
Next Generation Science Standards: For States, By States
(
The National Academies Press
,
Washington, DC
,
2013
).
2.
M.
Rogers
, “
An inquiry-based course using ‘physics?’ in cartoons and movies
,”
Phys. Teach.
45
,
38
41
(
Jan.
2007
).
3.
ComPADRE
, https://www.compadre.org/, accessed Aug. 20, 2018.
4.
Investigative Science Learning Environment
,
ISLE Physics Network
, http://www.islephysics.net/, accessed Aug. 20, 2018.
5.
Entertainment Software Association
, “
2018 Sales, Demographics, and Usage Data: Essential Facts about the Computer and Video Game Industry
,” http://www.theesa.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/EF2018_FINAL.pdf, accessed Aug. 2018.
6.
This website shows supporting data of video game users
: https://www.wepc.com/news/video-game-statistics/
7.
A.
Lenhart
 et al,
Teens, Video Games, and Civics
(
Pew Internet & American Life Project
,
Washington, DC
,
2008
).
8.
E.
Izadi
and
A.
Bezuijen
, “
Simulating direct shear tests with the bullet physics library: A validation study
,”
PLOS one
13
(
4
),
e0195073
(
2018
).
9.
N. D.
Finkelstein
 et al, “
When learning about the real world is better done virtually: A study of substituting computer simulations for laboratory equipment
,”
Phys. Rev. ST Phys. Educ. Res.
1
(
1
),
010103
(
2005
).
10.
H.
Kaufmann
and
B.
Meyer
, “
Physics education in virtual reality: An example
,”
Themes Sci. Technol. Educ.
2
,
117
130
(
2009
).
11.
C.
Like
, “
Harnessing students’ interest in physics with their own video games
,”
Phys. Teach.
49
,
222
224
(
April
2011
).
12.
M.
Griffiths
, “
The educational benefits of videogames
,”
Educ. Health
20
(
3
),
47
51
(
2002
).
13.
A. C.
Clark
and
J.
Ernst
, “
Gaming research for technology education
,”
J. STEM Educ. Innovations Res.
10
(
1/2
),
25
(
2009
).
14.
B.
Bediou
 et al, “
Meta-analysis of action video game impact on perceptual, attentional, and cognitive skills
,”
Psychol. Bull.
144
(
1
),
77
(
2018
).
15.
R.
Allain
and
R.
Williams
, “
An analysis of a video game
,”
Phys. Teach.
47
,
115
(
Feb.
2009
).
16.
D.
MacIsaac
, “
WebSights: STEMcoding project releases ‘Physics of Video Games’ Hour of Code activity
,”
Phys. Teach.
56
,
127
(
Feb.
2018
).
17.
D.
Croxton
and
G.
Kortemeyer
, “
Informal physics learning from video games: A case study using gameplay videos
,”
Phys. Educ.
53
(
1
),
015012
(
2017
).
18.
Video Game Physics: Where Physics Meets Fun, Rosengrant Stem Lab website
, http://www.usfsp.edu/rosengrant-stem-lab/video-game-physics/.
19.
D.
Rosengrant
,
P.
Money
, and
K.
Doyle
, “
Video Game Vignettes
,” Poster presented at the
Physics Education Research Conference
,
Washington, DC
(
Aug.
2018
); https://sites.google.com/view/rosengrantstemlab/home.
AAPT members receive access to The Physics Teacher and the American Journal of Physics as a member benefit. To learn more about this member benefit and becoming an AAPT member, visit the Joining AAPT page.