A possible extension activity to a recently published exercise on using actual real data from the Kepler mission to identify “possibly habitable” exoplanets in the habitable zones of their stars that could be offered to students is, once they have been identified, to calculate average surface temperatures for these planets and see if they are indeed within the habitability range of temperatures, 273 K to 373 K, at which water can exist as liquid.

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The estimated habitable zones for M, K, G, and F type stars and how they were estimated can be found in Ref. 1.
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