Nowadays, inquiry-based learning is getting a lot of attention as an effective education method. Therefore, it has been researched and implemented in various countries. Inquiry-based learning has been used in various subjects such as biology, mathematics, social studies, and others. In order to encourage a smooth implementation of inquiry-based learning in science, enhancement of scientific knowledge is primarily important. In general, scientific knowledge is taught to students in usual sessions of each subject such as physics, chemistry, and biology. During these sessions, the students mostly use some kind of textbook, in which various scientific terms and theories are described efficiently. However, the knowledge acquired via textbook-based learning could sometimes deviate from reality. And, consequently, the superficial and restrictive knowledge deviating from reality could prevent students’ appropriate interpretations and inspirations in inquiry-based learning. I would like to propose one effective approach to have students realize the gap between their knowledge acquired from textbooks and a real phenomenon, by using the spring as an example.

1.
D.
Cairns
and
S.
Areepattamannil
, “
Exploring the relations of inquiry-based teaching to science achievement and dispositions in 54 countries
,”
Res. Sci. Educ.
49
,
1
23
(Jan.
2019
).
2.
T.
Sachiko
, “
Are Japanese lower-secondary-school science lessons more inquiry-oriented than U.S. lessons
?”
J. Res. Sci. Educ.
58
(
1
),
41
53
(July
2017
).
3.
Y. G.
Mulder
,
A. W.
Lazonder
, and
T. D.
Jong
, “
Using heuristic worked examples to promote inquiry-based learning
,”
Learn. Instruct.
29
,
56
64
(Feb.
2014
).
4.
K.
Mäkitalo-Siegl
,
C.
Kohnle
, and
F.
Fischer
, “
Computer-supported collaborative inquiry learning and classroom scripts: Effects on help-seeking processes and learning outcomes
,”
Learn. Instruct
.
21
(
2
),
257
266
(April
2011
).
5.
I.
Sadeh
and
M.
Zion
, “
Which type of inquiry project do high school biology students prefer: Open or guided
?”
Res. Sci. Educ
.
42
(
5
),
831
848
(Oct.
2012
).
6.
I.
Mitsuyuki
,
T.
Tiemi
, and
A.
Norie
, “
Fibonacci sequence’s cycle themed RLA
,”
Bull. Faculty Educ. Univ. Ryukyus
88
,
307
318
(Feb.
2016
).
7.
K.
Toshinori
,
S.
Ikumi
, and
O.
Yuki
, “
Developing a teaching plan for the social studies of a junior high school focused on inquiring what is a good society: Based on the learning principles of the new course of studies
,”
Bull. Grad. School Educ. Okayama Univ.
141
,
59
68
(June
2009
).
8.
T.
Noriyuki
, “
Development of and experiments with bamboo springs
,”
Bull. Faculty Educ. Nagasaki Univ
.
33
,
43
50
(June
1999
).
9.
E.
Naoki
, “
How do springs expand? (II)
,”
J. Phys. Educ. Soc. Japan
50
(
4
),
248
249
(Sept.
2002
).
10.
I.
Kenichi
,
U.
Hiroshi
, and
M.
Atsushi
, “
A improvement of experimental instruments about Hooke’s law and the lesson practices
,”
Bull. Center Educ. Res. Practice Faculty Educ. Hum. Stud. Akita Univ.
37
,
69
80
(March
2015
).
11.
M. H.
Wu
and
W. Y.
Hsu
, “
Modelling the static and dynamic behavior of a conical spring by considering the coil close and damping effects
,”
J. Sound Vib
.
214
(
1
),
17
28
(July
1998
).
12.
I.
Akihisa
, “
Bulk glassy alloys: Historical development and current research
,”
Eng
.
1
(
2
),
185
191
(June
2015
).
AAPT members receive access to The Physics Teacher and the American Journal of Physics as a member benefit. To learn more about this member benefit and becoming an AAPT member, visit the Joining AAPT page.