Throughout students’ careers in physics, there are some topics that they learn multiple times and in multiple ways, and other topics that are briefly, if at all, discussed. I wanted to have the students think about all of the different physics topics they had learned in, most likely, a new way. Games have been used as a way to learn new physics ideas, as a way to examine the scientific process, and for other educational endeavors. I wanted to use a game to think about many physics topics from a different perspective. I modified a board game to enable students to have a competitive atmosphere in which they would be physically drawing and guessing physics ideas. In the game, every player is simultaneously drawing a specific item from a selection of items and also guessing what the other players are drawing. After each round, we would discuss their pictures, misconceptions, misremembered subjects, and other aspects of the drawings. While this game was first used in a senior seminar course, it can easily be modified to other courses and has since been used during a three-week high school outreach course.

1.
This paper outlines three simulations and games to help learn circuits and electrostatics:
D.
MacIsaac
, “
Three new simulations and games for teaching electrostatics and circuits: Craig’s ‘Metal Leaf Electroscope Simulator,’ Blackman’s ‘Crack the Circuit’, and Kortemeyer’s ‘Kirchhoff’s Revenge
,’”
Phys. Teach.
56
,
270
(
March
2018
).
2.
This paper describes a simple game showing a Boltzmann distribution involving random numbers:
P.
Black
,
P.
Davies
, and
J.
Ogborn
, “
A quantum shuffling game for teaching statistical mechanics
,”
Am. J. Phys.
39
,
1154
(
Oct.
1971
).
3.
This paper discusses using a card game to examine scientific thinking and is able to illustrate falsification test importance:
D.
Smith
, “
Learning the rules of the game
,”
Phys. Teach.
56
,
146
(
March
2018
).
4.
This paper describes how examining the moves made during a game to determine the rules of the game can be utilized to begin to understand the scientific process, including making and testing hypotheses:
D.
Maloney
and
M.
Masters
, “
Learning the game of formulating and testing hypotheses and theories
,”
Phys. Teach.
48
,
22
(
Jan.
2010
).
5.
“Pictomania” was previously published in the United States by Stronghold Games. Since summer 2018 it is published in the United States by Czech Games Edition.
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