There are many reasons for exposing physics students to primary source material in the sciences. These works can illuminate the history of science and give students a more vivid picture of the development of physics than most textbooks attempt to provide. They can also serve as pedagogical tools for exploring the misconceptions and “wrong answers” of the past as a way to clarify physical laws and definitions, and as assessment tools for probing students’ conceptual understanding of these laws and definitions in their modern form.

1.
Thomas
Kuhn
,
The Structure of Scientific Revolutions
, 3rd ed. (
University of Chicago Press
,
Chicago
,
1996
), p.
138
.
2.
Isaac
Newton
,
Principia: Vol. I The Motion of Bodies
(
University of California Press
,
Berkeley
,
1962
), p.
13
.
3.
Rene
Descartes
,
Principles of Philosophy: On Motion
, translated by
Michael S.
Mahoney
, http://www.princeton.edu/∼hos/Mahoney/texts/descartes/desc-mot.html#part3, accessed on April 20, 2016.
4.
Ibid.
5.
Ibid.
6.
Rene
Descartes
,
Principles of Philosophy: Translated with Explanatory Notes
, translated by
Miller
and
Miller
(
Kluwer Academic Publishers
,
Boston
,
1982
).
7.
Christiaan
Huygens
,
On the Motion of Bodies Resulting from Impact
, translated by
Michael S.
Mahoney
, http://www.princeton.edu/∼hos/Mahoney/texts/huygens/impact/huyimpct.html, accessed on April 20, 2016.
8.
Ibid.
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