This is the second of two articles on MRI physics. In this article I discuss what a class of physics students might expect to see and learn from a field trip to a full-scale MRI. Magnetic resonance imaging is not only becoming a more common medical diagnostic tool—it is now a more common research tool. Being such an important application of physics, many universities have their own MRI for their medical physics programs.

1.
S.
Taghizadeh
and
J.
Lincoln
, “
MRI experiments for introductory physics
,”
Phys. Teach.
56
,
266
268
(
April
2018
).
2.
R. J.
Stafford
, “High Field MRI: Technology, Applications, Safety, and Limitations,” (
The University of Texas
).
3.
Neuroscience Clerkship at UH/VA: Basic Core III, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, http://casemed.case.edu/clerkships/neurology/Web%20Neurorad/MRI%20Basics.htm.
4.
Radiopaedia also tags links on MRI pulse sequences, parameters, and protocols in the following article:
Vicci
du Plessis
et al, “
MRI sequences (overview)
,”
Radiopaedia
, https://radiopaedia.org/articles/mri-sequences-overview.
10.
An excellent PowerPoint on MRI safety is
Charlie
Dziedzic
et al., “
Magnetic Resonsance Imaging (MRI Safety
,” http://www.munsonhealthcare.org/upload/docs/Physician%20Web%20Scheduler/MRI%20Safety%20Presentation.pdf.
11.
This article continues under the Supplemental tab at TPT Online, http://dxreee.doi.org/10.1119/1.5051167 E-PHTEAH-56-031806.

Supplementary Material

AAPT members receive access to The Physics Teacher and the American Journal of Physics as a member benefit. To learn more about this member benefit and becoming an AAPT member, visit the Joining AAPT page.