Virtual images are often introduced through a “geometric” perspective, with little conceptual or qualitative illustrations, hindering a deeper understanding of this physical concept. In this paper, we present two rather simple observations that force a critical reflection on the optical nature of a virtual image. This approach is supported by the reflect-view, a useful device in geometrical optics classes because it allows a visual confrontation between virtual images and real objects that seemingly occupy the same region of space.

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We are ignoring the finite thickness of the Plexiglas and the fact that it has two reflecting surfaces, because we believe this simplification does not compromise the understanding of image formation at this level.
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