We present a showcase with interactive exhibits of basic physical experiments that constitutes a complementary method for teaching physics and interesting students in physical phenomena. Our interactive physics showcase, shown in Fig. 1, stimulates interest for science by letting the students experience, firsthand, surprising phenomena and teaching physical concepts. By letting the students interact with the experiments under optimum safety conditions and with good protection against vandalism, our approach complements interactive simulations, e.g., as offered by the Physics Education Technology project.1

1.
phet.colorado.edu; see also
Katherine
Perkins
,
Wendy
Adams
,
Michael
Dubson
,
Noah
Finkelstein
,
Sam
Reid
,
Carl
Wieman
, and
Ron
LeMaster
, “
PhET: Interactive simulations for teaching and learning physics
,”
Phys. Teach.
44
,
18
23
(
Jan. 2006
).
2.
Joseph
Priest
and
James
Poth
, “
Teaching physics with coupled pendulums
,”
Phys. Teach.
20
,
80
85
(
Feb. 1982
).
3.
Robert M.
Williamson
, “
Filters for color mixing
,”
Phys. Teach.
36
,
22
(
Jan. 1998
).
4.
John B.
Johnston
, “
Projecting Poisson's spot
,”
Phys. Teach.
16
,
179
(
March 1978
), and references therein.
5.
Don
Easton
, “
Transmission through crossed polaroid filters
,”
Phys. Teach.
39
,
231
233
(
April 2001
).
6.
R. D.
Edge
, “
The Brachistochrone—Or, the longer way round may be the quickest way home
,”
Phys. Teach.
23
,
372
373
(
Sept. 1985
).
8.
Carlos
Saraiva
, “
Demonstrating Lenz's law with recycled materials
,”
Phys. Teach.
44
,
182
183
(
March 2006
).
9.
Arthur E.
Woodruff
, “
The radiometer and how it does not work
,”
Phys. Teach.
6
,
358
363
(
Oct. 1968
).
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