For live classroom demonstrations there are a number of devices that have been used to simulate waves. Some are based upon a design produced by E. S. Ritchie & Sons1 and consist of rods and cams that are activated by turning a crank.2,3 These devices show what transverse and longitudinal waves look like, but they do not allow for the free manipulation of wave parameters and observations of the changes that take place. A simple device can be constructed using elastic bands and straws4 to demonstrate properties of transverse waves.

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The magnets are Model# NR008-1 from www.magnet4less.com.
8.
The carbon fiber rod is Product #020078 available at www.goodwinds.com.
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