Several years ago I attended an AAPT Haunted Physics Workshop taught by Dr. Tom Zepf from Creighton University. Dr. Zepf's highly successful Haunted Physics Lab1 at Creighton was put on every October by his physics majors. I found the concept of exhibiting physics projects in a “fun” way to students, faculty, and the public very exciting, so an idea brewed in my head to use this at our university. When our dean asked me to design an introductory physics course for non‐science majors, I decided it was the right time to put the haunted lab idea to use. The ensuing course, entitled “Phascination in Physics,” was designed as a half‐semester 4.0‐credit physics lecture/lab course for non‐science majors.

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F. Goldberg, S. Robinson, V. Otero, and N. Thompson, Physics and Everyday Thinking (PET); http://cpucips.sdsu.edu/web/pet/index.html (2007).
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