There exists numerous books and articles about the Principia, some very scholarly and others mainly pedagogical, which can be found in the extensive list of references in the book by Colin Pask. He had the good fortune to be born in the same village where Newton was born, and I suspect this contributes to the ebullience for Newton's genius displayed in Pask's book. It is also sprinkled with many quotes of admiration from Nobel Prize winners, including some exaggerations like Steven Weinberg's, “all that has happened since 1687 [the publication date] is a gloss on the Principia” (p. 93). Pask follows the procedure in Chandrasekhar's book, The Principia for the Common Reader, by discussing Newton's Propositions in the modern language of the differential calculus. But although he includes the diagrams associated with these Propositions, he does not describe the geometrical proofs. It should be remembered that Newton wrote...

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