The mechanics of the surf skimmer, fun sport at the beach, is re-examined by using fundamental fluid mechanics. Comparison of the existing theories and consideration of the effects previously neglected lead to the conclusion: Edge’s model is physically incorrect; Tuck and Dixon’s theory provides physical insights into the surf skimming; there are several trade-offs in the mechanics of the surf skimmer and these make this sport fun and challenging.

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