We have modified a toy to demonstrate first- and second-order phase transitions. The toy consists of a ball constrained to move on a rotating hoop. Analysis of the equilibrium positions of the ball as a function of the angular velocity and location of the axis of rotation shows that this system contains a cusp catastrophe.

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